Tag Archives: Car

A Short Tribute to the 80s Ford Mustang

Beautiful mustangThe 1980s Ford Mustang is one of the most iconic car models of our time, lauded for its innovative design and speed. Widely marketed as a sports automobile, it has long stayed in the hearts of the public as it continues to be one of the most well-recognized cars coursing the country’s highways and thoroughfares.

It is so popular, car parts vendor Anderson Ford Motorsport has a steady market of customers looking for ‘86 to ’93 Mustang parts.

The Ford Mustang III, in fact, had sold 2.6 million units since its initial release. Let us take a trip down memory lane and revisit some of the old Ford Mustang models that were wildly popular back in the day.

Mustang GT

The Mustang GT made a major comeback in the 1980s after put on pause for 13 years. Ford announced the comeback in a big way, with an ad headline that screamed, “The Boss Is Back” during the 1982 re-launch of the popular muscle car.

Although lacking in horsepower at just 150, the car subsequently had upgrades with the addition of a four-barrel carburetor.

Mustang SVO

The mid-1980s was a lackluster time for Mustang, as sales for Ford’s Fox-body Mustangs declined. Ford wanted to retire the line, prompting Ford’s Special Operations team to step up. By 1984, the limited-edition Mustang SVO finally entered the market and was in production until 1986.

The car ran on a 175-horsepower engine and performed better than the competition, such as the Toyota Supra, the Porsche 924, and the Nissan 280ZX, the website reported.

Mustang SVT Cobra

The year 1987 saw a Mustang that was different in appearance altogether. The new muscle car possessed an aerodynamic design that was decidedly sporty. It also ran on a 5.0-liter V-8 engine that could generate up to 225 horsepower.

Ford’s Special Vehicle Team came up with a special edition of this car, which ran on 235 horsepower and put out 280 foot-pounds of torque.

There you have it. This is but a short tribute to the muscle car that has bedazzled millions. If you have one, consider all of these while you take your Mustang for a spin.

The Kiwi Love Affair with Utes and Old Cars

Old CarIf you visit or move to New Zealand, one of the first things you’ll probably notice is the rarity or lack of shiny new cars. Utes, or utility vehicles and old cars dominate even the most urbanised areas.

A study reports that the average age of cars passes fourteen years, suggesting that Kiwis are reluctant to dump their old cars. Let’s take a look at how this aged fleet epidemic took shape.

Why Kiwis love utes so much

Coupe utility, better known as a ‘ute’ in Kiwi and Aussie vocabulary, is a utility vehicle that looks like a pickup truck. Laden with beastly engines and a spacious cargo tray, Kiwis love this vehicle so much simply because it suits their rugged lifestyles.

Because there is a big overlap between city and country living, Kiwis don’t usually feel the need to own two cars for city and off-road driving. The ute is a lifestyle business owner or hobbypreneur’s best friend. And car dealers have learned to adapt to this seemingly eternal trend.

The good news, according to Rapid Loans, is that over the past five years, in order to meet safety and emissions standards, city-friendly and economic ute models are increasingly becoming a top choice among new and veteran buyers.

Why Kiwis hold on to old cars

It does not mean, however, that Kiwis are ignoring the warnings about safety and environmental risks associated with old vehicles. The reluctance to dump their old bangers seems to be deeply rooted in the national sensibility.

Kiwis are generally practical and environment-friendly people who believe that by buying used car imports or holding on to their cars longer are eco-friendlier choices. Affordability has also become an issue.

The cost of living in the major cities has become so challenging that buying a new car would drown low to middle-income residents in debt. But government incentives are under way to encourage locals to buy newer models to modernise the fleet.

Though it may seem that New Zealanders’ relationship with their old cars will endure in a few more years, the situation is improving. While they hold on to their utes and old cars dearly, they are very much willing to let go of the long-held perception that older vehicles are cheaper and friendlier to the environment.

A Car Idling for 10 Minutes Wastes a Quarter Liter of Fuel

Red CarMost uninformed drivers assume that leaving the car idle for a prolonged time is normal and alright. This, however, is not really the case, and your exhaust engine begs to differ.

There are numerous occasions when you may end up leaving your car idle: while picking up your child from school, while stuck in nasty traffic, or just sitting in your driveway while waiting. If you leave your car idle for more than 10 minutes, though, it might be a better idea to just turn the engine off.

Waste More by Turning Off or On?

A common misconception among drivers is that starting your car wastes more gas than idling. Technically, it’s true — but for only 5 to 10 seconds.

According to the Hinkle Charitable Foundation, idling the vehicle wastes gas. Americans waste approximately 3.8 million gallons of gasoline due to voluntary idling every single day. Professionals believe that restarting an engine is more efficient than keeping it running and idle for a prolonged amount of time. Otherwise, you should just turn it off.

How Much Fuel do you Waste?

Fuel costs are unpredictable. One minute you’re enjoying the lull, the next thing you know, you are facing incremental costs. Because of the sudden ups and downs, it’s important to make the most out of every drop. Idling your car does the exact opposite.

The average driver spends an estimated 16 minutes of his time idling. Doing so amounts to around $116 a year for 4-cylinder engines. Keeping it idle for more than 10 seconds alone equates to 1/5 gallon of fuel. This offsets any cash you saved due to gas price reductions in recent months.

Other Damages by Idling

Apart from wasting fuel, excessive idling also corrodes your exhaust system. According to Hudiburg Subaru, Subaru Dealer in Oklahoma, the condensed water infiltrates the exhaust, which encourages corrosion. The replacement of the entire system costs more than $1000, depending on the make and model of your car. Further idling can also result in engine wear, which adds to unnecessary expenses.

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you are just sitting idly in your car, go ahead and turn of the engine. Your wallet and your car will love you more for it.

Buying a Used Car: Effective Hacks to Determine the Right One for You

Buying a Used CarWhat is the first thing that worries you when you are out to buy a used car? Bumping into compromising deals is probably the one that bothers you most. This is perfectly understandable, as you do not know what you might get into upon purchasing a pre-owned vehicle.

There are, however, many ways to actually overcome this hesitation and get the most of what you can afford. There are  plenty of quality and top performing pre-owned cars available if only you have the full knowledge to spot them. Whether you are looking to buy a used car in Arkansas or any other state for that matter, industry professional Central Auto Sales notes that it pays to know the simple hacks. 

Work within a given price range

Think of the display center as an ocean full of used cars that is readily within your reach. If you are not conscious enough of your budget, you just might give in to enticing offers thus end up spending so much more. Try to work on a given budget. You also need to make sure that aside from the car itself, payments for license plates, insurance, registrations, and taxes fall within your targeted budget.

Hire a reputable mechanic

Car dealers are known to be great in luring potential clients into thinking that they are getting the best deal. One way for you to truly check if you are getting the best used car is to bring a personal mechanic to help you out in assessing the overall quality and status of the vehicle. If your mechanic spots some issues, you can actually use those problems to negotiate for lower pricing.

Check the car history

Doing a little research on both the service records as well as title history records is a must when buying a pre-owned car. Ask your dealer if he can provide you with service record in order to check the frequency of maintenance and oil change performed for the car. Title history records help you get a better idea of whether the car that you are about to buy was registered as a personal car or rental and fleet vehicle. If, for example, a car was exposed to floods, such issue will reflect on title history records.

Beware of flood damaged cars

Any car will hardly perform well once it has been damaged by floodwater. This is just one sad fact of life that one has to bear.  If you chance upon one that has been flooded, the right thing to do is look for another potential.

These are the things you should keep in mind when buying a used car. Find time to look for more factors to get closer to your goal of getting the best performing pre-owned car possible.